NAIDOC Week 2018: Celebrating our women

Representing women: Dr Jackie Huggins AM, FAHA, will be one of many keynote speakers at the National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference. Photo: Eva Schroeder.
Representing women: Dr Jackie Huggins AM, FAHA, will be one of many keynote speakers at the National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference. Photo: Eva Schroeder.

ADVERTISING FEATURE

NAIDOC Week 2018 runs nationally from Sunday, July 8 to Sunday, July 15.

2018’s National NAIDOC Week theme is ‘Because of her, we can!’

According to the NAIDOC website: 

“NAIDOC Week 2018 will celebrate the invaluable contributions that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have made – and continue to make - to our communities, our families, our rich history and to our nation.”

Throughout NAIDOC Week, many local community groups and organisations have been encouraged to hold various events, talks, exhibitions and ceremonies to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

MAIN EVENT

The National NAIDOC Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Conference will take place in Sydney on July 11 and 12.

Day one  is open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander woman, and then day invites all women to join in and celebrate the theme. The cost is $175 per day.

“As pillars of our society, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have played – and continue to play - active and significant roles at the community, local, state and national levels,” organisers said. “All of the speakers and workshop presenters are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander woman who are leaders, trailblazers, politicians, activists and social change advocates. These women fought and continue to fight, for justice, equal rights, our rights to country, for law and justice, access to education, employment and to maintain and celebrate our culture, language, music and art.”

Visit ngiyani.com/because-of-her-we-can.

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ABOUT NAIDOC

NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee.

Part of the reason it was formed was the idea of transforming the National Day of Mourning (initiated on January 26 1938) from a simple protest into something that would instead celebrate Aboriginal culture.

Originally known as NADOC, by 1974 it was composed entirely of Aboriginal members.

In 1975, it was decided that the event needed to take place over a whole a week rather than just a day. That week has been the first to second Sunday in July ever since.

The organisation was expanded in the 1990s to to recognise Torres Strait Islander people and culture as well.

Since 2005 a National NAIDOC Committee has made key decisions regarding the national celebrations each year, and since 2008 Anne Martin and Ben Mitchell have been serving as the committee’s co-chairs.