Lithgow Mercury

ANZAC Day 2022Advertising Feature

For those who fell on foreign shoresAdvertising Feature

RESPECT: Marchers can wear their own or a relative's medals. Your own medals should be worn on the left hand side of your chest, over your heart.

AS the sun rises on April 25, thousands of Australians will attend a solemn ceremony.

The Anzac Day dawn service is usually held at a town cenotaph, a memorial park, and the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.

Later in the day, people will join the Anzac Day march and parade, alongside schoolchildren and perhaps relatives wearing medals bestowed to loved ones.

A commemoration service may also be held, where a wreath may be laid at a cenotaph or monument marking soldiers who fell when serving their country.

MODERN DAY: The Gallipoli peninsula, where the original Anzacs landed.

In the afternoon, people may indulge in a game of two-up at their local pub or club.

Anzac Day marks the first landing of Diggers from the Australian Imperial Force at Gaba Tepe, now known as Anzac Cove, on April 25, 1915.

Twenty-thousand Australian soldiers landed just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula.

By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs, killed by Turkish troops.

TRADITION: Laying a wreath entwined with rosemary, which symbolises remembrance, is popular on Anzac Day. Wreaths were first used by ancient Romans to crown victors.

The Gallipoli campaign claimed the lives of 8000 Australian soldiers; in all, more than 60,000 Australians died during World War I.

Anzac Days remember their courage and valour and provide a nation with an opportunity to reflect on our first major military action during World War I.

Lest we forget.

Time to remember, reflectAdvertising Feature

LEST WE FORGET: Anzac Day commemorates the courage and valour of those who fell on that first day of the Gallipoli campaign, April 25, 1915.

THEY left Australia eager for adventure and to see the world.

Those first volunteer soldiers returned barely a year later, having witnessed nearly 9000 of their mates killed on the shores of a far-off place called Gallipoli.

The sacrifice of those 'Knights of Gallipoli' was honoured at the first Anzac Day, held on April 25, 1916.

Every state held ceremonies to honour the fallen.

In Sydney, 4000 returned men led a procession that included 50 cars bearing the injured.

It was a similar turn-out in Perth, where 'the men of The Landing' marched up The Esplanade before turning into the Central Railway Station, observed and cheered by hundreds along the route.

Melbourne, Brisbane, and Adelaide also hosted Anzac Day marches, while 2000 Australian and New Zealand troops marched in London.

DAY TO REMEMBER: The first Anzac Day was held in Sydney in 1916. Four thousand returned soldiers led a procession that included 50 cars bearing the injured.

After serving at Gallipoli, many of those who returned were expected to help recruit new volunteers at recruitment centres in nearby suburbs and towns.

Each man vowed to secure one new soldier.

To this day, Anzac Day marks the first landing of Diggers from the Australian Imperial Force at Gaba Tepe, now known as Anzac Cove, on April 25, 1915.

CALLED UP: Many of those who returned after serving at Gallipoli were expected to help recruit new volunteers at recruitment centres in nearby suburbs and towns.

Twenty-thousand Australian soldiers landed just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula.

By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs, killed by Turkish troops under the command of Mustafa Kemal Atatrk.

These "worthy sons of the Empire" fought a piecemeal battle under mixed orders.

Successive Anzac Days remember their courage and boldness and provide a nation with an opportunity to reflect on our first major military action during World War I.

The Gallipoli campaign claimed the lives of 8000 Australian soldiers; in all, more than 60,000 Australians died during World War I.

It wasn't until the 1920s that Anzac Day became a day of commemoration.

The dawn service marks when the first wave of Anzacs stepped ashore at Gallipoli; the first such service was held as a requiem mass in Albany in 1918.

Anzac Day grew in the 1930s to include other events, such as playing two-up.

It was also a day for returned soldiers' reunions.

Canberra held its first Anzac Day service commemoration at the War Memorial in 1942.

This has become the centre for the nation's modern Anzac Days, with prime ministers and opposition leaders laying wreaths.

Thousands make the annual pilgrimage to dawn services held at Gallipoli.

More than 70 cemeteries dot the landscape, with many more unmarked graves in countless mass pits.