Lithgow’s Geoffrey Tame’s to undertake walk for Westmead Children's Hospital

Stepping up: Lithgow's Geoffrey Tame will undertake a 300-kilometre walk for the Westmead Children's Hospital in September.
Stepping up: Lithgow's Geoffrey Tame will undertake a 300-kilometre walk for the Westmead Children's Hospital in September.

Lithgow man Geoffrey Tame will walk almost 300 kilometres from Bathurst to Westmead later this year to raise money for the Sydney Children’s Hospital, Westmead.

Mr Tame is no stranger to the journey, having walked from Bathurst to Parramatta 10 years ago to raise money and awareness for the children’s hospital.

On that occasion he raised more than $200,000.

“I’ve always liked walking, it keeps me fit. I decided to do one this year. The previous one I raised over $200,000, I had some big sponsors for that one,” he said.

“I’ve done two previous walkathons. I’m doing this one for the Children’s Hospital Westmead, the same as I did in 2008. 

“Before that I did one from Lithgow to Orange for a local girl to go to Scotland for Highland dancing, to help her with her airfares and costs.”

Mr Tame plans to set off from Bathurst on September 12, and said he has already received support from the community.

“I’ve already got a few sponsors on board,” he said.

I’ve done two previous walkathons. I’m doing this one for the Children’s Hospital Westmead, the same as I did in 2008.

Geoffrey Tame

He is well into his training, and can regularly be seen on Hassans Walls Road, preparing himself for the more difficult parts of trip.

“I’ve been in training for six months. I started with flat walking, and then gradually started going up hills,” Mr Tame said.

“The last [Bathurst to Sydney] I did in 37 hours, it wasn’t bad going. I got from Bathurst to Lithgow in one day.

“Once you get to Mount Victoria it’s pretty easygoing. It’s virtually downhill. Last time I did Lithgow to Leura in one day. Parramatta Road is a bit hectic with all the traffic.”

This time Mr Tame could have company on the walk, with someone expressing an interest to join him. He said the permit for the walk will allow two people on the road.

In addition, he has support vehicles with flashing lights and signs ahead and behind him to alert people to someone on the edge of the road.

Mr Tame said he enjoyed being able to raise money to help the hospital and also enjoyed the interaction with the community while on the walk.

“People are pretty good along the way, they encourage you and give you a boost.”