Lithgow students get tips and tricks breaking into the job market

WORKING IT OUT: Lithgow High students Tom Luchetti, Zane Andison, Dylan Miles, Bryson Dukes, Amber Shaw, Kayla Giles, Emilee Mart with Kirstin Casey. Picture: PHOEBE MOLONEY.
WORKING IT OUT: Lithgow High students Tom Luchetti, Zane Andison, Dylan Miles, Bryson Dukes, Amber Shaw, Kayla Giles, Emilee Mart with Kirstin Casey. Picture: PHOEBE MOLONEY.

The NSW Business Chamber’s program the ‘Skillsroad Show’ arrived at Lithgow on Wednesday, April 11, to inspire students to start thinking about career pathways for the future. 

Year 10 and 11 students participated in a workshop covering job-hunting and interview skills as well as advice on how to pick a job role to pursue.

As part of the career day Shane Wade and Ash Fitzpatrick from the Lithgow Workmen’s Club shared their career journey with students, demonstrating that changing jobs and industries is definitely part of the process. 

Selected students also participated in a career mapping workshop woth Skillroad Show’s Kirstin Casey. She has been travelling to schools throughout NSW as part of the roadshow. 

The workshop: Picture: PHOEBE MOLONEY.

The workshop: Picture: PHOEBE MOLONEY.

“I’ve found that students are worried that if they make one decision they have to stick it with it forever,” Ms Casey said. 

She said students should expect to change directions in their career at some point. 

“Nothing is wasted time.”

She said that the most important thing when deciding upon a career path is thinking about your life as a whole.

“When thinking about what pathway is right for you, you have to think wholistically, not only what you are good at, what you like and your passions but also what do you want your life to look like.

“Do you want to work outdoors or indoors? Do you want some flexibility in your hours and so on.” 

During the presentation she mentioned the importance of thinking about the expectations that come along with a certain job – for example, she said, if you were considering nursing you should take into account you will be required to work long shifts and do night work. 

“You really have to do as much research as you can – research the job, the TAFE and the university courses.” 

She acknowledged that finding work in regional areas can be hard for young people. 

“The most important thing for students to be doing is work experience, which can be assisted by their school, and then walking around and handing out resumes to businesses, introducing themselves to businesses in the area and just being persistent.” 

The NSW Chamber of business youth employment program has a website where resources can be found for parents, teachers and employers and young job seekers.