Lithgow firefighters to tackle gruelling climb up Sydney Tower

CLIMB FOR A CAUSE: Firefighters Gavin Lynch, Scott Wilkinson, Zone Commander Sel Mathias, Nick Thurlow, Cameron Stevenson and Mick Evans will be taking on all 98 storeys of Sydney Tower to raise funds for Motor Neurone Disease Reserch. Picture: HOSEA LUY
CLIMB FOR A CAUSE: Firefighters Gavin Lynch, Scott Wilkinson, Zone Commander Sel Mathias, Nick Thurlow, Cameron Stevenson and Mick Evans will be taking on all 98 storeys of Sydney Tower to raise funds for Motor Neurone Disease Reserch. Picture: HOSEA LUY

Climbing all 1504 stairs and 98 storeys of Sydney Tower would be tough at the best of times but imagine taking on the imposing structure while wearing full firefighting kit, an extra 20 kilos.

Six of our own men from the Lithgow Fire and Rescue 363 squad will join hundreds of others firefighters taking on the gruelling climb to raise money for Motor Neurone Disease (MND) research at Macquarie University.

Lithgow’s Cameron Stevenson said he and his fellow climbing crew have been doing continuous stepping twice a week and other cardio workouts for the past two months to prepare for the challenge.

Alongside Mr Stevenson, firefighters Gavin Lynch, Scott Wilkinson, Nick Thurlow, Mick Evans and Zone Commander Sel Mathias were stepping up to the plate.

None of the group have taken on the Sydney Tower climb before but confidence was high ahead of the event on Saturday, October 14.

“The boys have been practicing really hard and training really hard,” Mr Stevenson said.

“We’re looking forward to climbing it up and ticking that box and making a difference in regards to raising awareness and funds for Motor Neurone Disease.”

Mr Stevenson said the the effects of MND hit close to home for the Fire and Rescue service and this was a huge motivator to be involved in the fundraiser.

“I think it’s really necessary, it’s affected firefighters because we’ve lost some of our own to Motor Neurone Disease and it just gives you a sense of purpose and gives us a chance to look after each other.”

MND is a progressive, terminal neurological disease, which has no known treatment or cure.

More than two people die from MND in Australia each day. The death rate has also risen significantly over recent decades with MND killing one in 500 Australians in 1985 compared to one in 180 Australians in 2011.

The Firefighters Climb for MND has a goal to raise $1,000,000 in 2017.

Donate to the Lithgow 363 team at firiesclimb.gofundraise.com.au/page/lithgow363