Time to be a responsible pet owner during National Desexing Month

Responsible pet ownership: Puppies and kittens may be cute but supply far outweighs demand, leading to many pets being dumped in animal shelters. Desexing addresses this problem and has many health benefits for your pet.

Responsible pet ownership: Puppies and kittens may be cute but supply far outweighs demand, leading to many pets being dumped in animal shelters. Desexing addresses this problem and has many health benefits for your pet.

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Every loving pet owner would like their pet live a longer, healthier and happier life. We would all also like to see less stray and neglected animals.

National Desexing Month in July highlights a procedure that can achieve both these aims.

RSPCA NSW said it can take just two years for one female cat and her offspring to produce around 20,000 kittens. And in only five years, one female dog and her offspring can produce approximately 20,000 puppies.

Many don’t end up finding their forever homes. Some are dumped, left to fend for themselves on the streets. Others end up in pounds and shelters, putting incredible strain on their resources.

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Some pet owners say they can’t afford to have their pet desexed, however during National Desexing Month many veterinary clinics offer significant discounts on the procedure. 

The organisation behind the month is the National Desexing Network (NDN), a nationwide referral system for discounted desexing available to pet owners in financial need.

The NDN said that some of the benefits of desexing cats and dogs include:

Health

  • Reduced risk of getting cancer or other diseases of the reproductive organs, such as testicular cancer, prostate cancer/disorders in males, and cystic ovaries, ovarian tumors, acute uterine infections and breast cancer in females, and also other diseases like mammary cancer, perianal tumors and perianal hamias.
  • Females can suffer from physical and nutritional exhaustion if continually breeding.
  • Pets generally live longer and healthier lives.

Behavioural

  • Pets are less prone to wander, fight, and are less likely to get lost or injured.
  • Reduces territorial behaviour such as spraying indoors.
  • Less likely to suffer from anti-social behaviours. They become more affectionate and become better companions.
  • Eliminates "heat" cycles in female cats and their efforts to get outside in search for a mate.
  • Eliminates male dogs' urge to "mount" people's legs.

Cost

  • Reduces the cost to the community of having to care for unwanted puppies and kittens in pounds and shelters.
  • No additional food or vet bills for the offspring.
  • No need to find homes for unwanted or unexpected litters of puppies or kittens.
  • Save money from expensive surgeries from car accidents or fights, which are less likely to occur if your pet doesn't roam around.
  • Dumping puppies and kittens is an ethical cost, as well as being illegal and inhumane.

Details: ndn.org.au

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